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Sato-Johnson Communique

Washington, D.C., 13th January, 1965


1. President Johnson and Prime Minister Sato met in Washington on January 12 and 13, 1965, to exchange views on the current international situation and matters of mutual interest to the United States and Japan. They were assisted by Secretary Rusk and Foreign Minister [Etsusaburo] Shiina and Secretary-General [Takeo] Miki of the Liberal Democratic Party.

2. The President and the Prime Minister reviewed the present international situation and reaffirmed the partnership of the two countries which grows out of common beliefs and the shared objective of a lasting peace based on justice, freedom and prosperity for all peoples. They expressed a firm determination that the two countries should cooperate more closely in seeking this common objective. They agreed that for this purpose the two countries should maintain the closest contact and consultation not only on problems lying between them but on problems affecting Asia and the world in general.

3. The President and the Prime Minister, recognizing the valuable role of the United Nations in the maintenance of the peace and prosperity of the world, exchanged frank views on the difficult questions now confronting the United Nations, and agreed to continue cooperative efforts to strengthen the functions of the United Nations and to enhance its authority.

4. The President and the Prime Minister rec-ognized the desirability of promoting arms control and a reduction of the arms race as rapidly as possible, and strongly hoped that, following the partial test ban treaty, further steps can be made toward the realization of a total nuclear test ban.

5. The President and the Prime Minister, recognizing that the question of China is a problem having a vital bearing on the peace and stability of Asia, exchanged frank views on the positions of their respective countries and agreed to maintain close consultation with each other on this matter. The President emphasized the United States policy of firm support for the Republic of China and his grave concern that Communist China's militant policies and expansionist pressures against its neighbors endanger the peace of Asia. The Prime Minister stated that it is the fundamental policy of the Japanese Government to maintain friendly ties based on the regular diplomatic relationship with the Government of the Republic of China and at the same time to continue to promote private contact which is being maintained with the Chinese mainland in such matters as trade on the basis of the principle of separation of political matters from economic matters.

6. The President and the Prime Minister expressed their deep concern over the unstable and troubled situation in Asia, particularly in Vietnam, and agreed that continued perseverance would be necessary for freedom and independence in South Vietnam. They reaffirmed their belief that peace and progress in Asia are prerequisites to peace in the whole world.

7. The President and the Prime Minister recognized that the elevation of living standards and the advancement of social welfare are essential for the political stability of developing nations throughout the world and agreed to strengthen their economic cooperation with such countries. They agreed to continue to consult on the forms of such assistance. The Prime Minister expressed a particular interest in expanding Japan's role in developmental and technical assistance for Asia.

8. The President and the Prime Minister reaffirmed their belief that it is essential for the stability and peace of Asia that there be no uncertainty about Japan's security. From this viewpoint, the Prime Minister stated that Japan's basic policy is to maintain firmly the United States-Japan Mutual Cooperation and Security Treaty arrangements, and the President reaffirmed the United States determination to abide by its commitment under the Treaty to defend Japan against any armed attack from the outside.

9. The President and the Prime Minister affirmed the importance of constantly seeking even closer relationships between the two countries. In particular, they recognized the vital importance to both countries of the expansion of their economic relations sustained by the growth of their respective economies, and agreed that the two countries should cooperate with each other in the worldwide efforts for the expansion of world trade and for effective international monetary cooperation.

10. The President and the Prime Minister confirmed the desirability of maintaining and utilizing the Joint United States-Japan Committee on Trade and Economic Affairs where exchange of views takes place at the cabinet level, as well as the United States-Japan Committee on Scientific Cooperation and the Joint United States-Japan Conference on Cultural and Educational Interchange. They further agreed that the fourth meeting of the joint United States-Japan Committee on Trade and Economic Affairs would be held in July of this year.

11. The President and the Prime Minister recognized the importance of United States military installations on the Ryukyu and Bonin Islands for the security of the Far East. The Prime Minister expressed the desire that, as soon as feasible, the administrative control over these islands will be restored to Japan and also a deep interest in the expansion of the autonomy of the inhabitants of the Ryukyus and in further promoting their welfare. Appreciating the desire of the Government and people of Japan for the restoration of administration to Japan, the President stated that he looks forward to the day when the security interests of the free world in the Far East will permit the realization of this desire. They confirmed that the United States and Japan should continue substantial economic assistance to the Ryukyu Islands in order to advance further the welfare and well-being of the inhabitants of these islands. They expressed their satisfaction with the smooth operation of the cooperative arrangements between the United States and Japan concerning assistance to the Ryukyu Islands. They agreed in principle to broaden the functions of the existing Japan-United States Consultative Committee so as to enable the Committee to conduct consultations not only on economic assistance to the Ryukyu Islands but also on other matters on which the two countries can cooperate in continuing to promote the well-being of the inhabitants of the islands. The President agreed to give favorable consideration to an ancestral graves visit by a representative group of former residents of the Bonin Islands.

12. The President and the Prime Minister discussed the United States-Japan Civil Air Transport Agreement, the North Pacific Fisheries Convention, private investment in Japan, the Interest Equalization Tax and other economic matters. They agreed on the importance of close consultation and cooperation between the two governments to attain mutually acceptable and equitable solutions to issues pending between the United States and Japan.

13. The President and the Prime Minister, mindful of the many areas of human health which are of great concern to all the peoples of Asia, agreed to undertake a greatly expanded program of cooperation in medical science with respect to such diseases as malaria, cholera, schistosomiasis, tuberculosis, and stomach cancer, in addition to cooperative efforts on problems of air pollution and pesticides. As a first step to implement the agreement, they agreed to convene a conference of the foremost medical scientists from the United States and Japan to work out the details of the new program for discussion with other governments concerned.

14. The President and the Prime Minister expressed their satisfaction with the meeting just held and their desire to continue to maintain close personal contact.



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